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Webchat: Migraine Action Mon 8th Aug 4.30-5pm

Join us for a chat from 4:30pm on Monday 8th August 2016.

Keep getting Migraines or know someone who suffers with them? Do you want help and support? Join us online on Monday 8th August at 4.30-5pm to talk about Migraines. Ask a professional from Migraine Action about the facts and what can help.

Remember all of the chats are completely anonymous, safe and secure, see our terms and conditions for more information.

In order to post in our chat section you'll need to login or register some details first. Don't worry we wont display any personal information on the site, and you can choose an anonymous username.
User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:17

HI, This web chat starts in 15 mins. Today's topic will be on migraine. I am Rebekah from Migraine Action. log on and have a chat, and asks any questions on migraine. Join us at 4:30pm

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:30

Hi this chat is now open. Please feel free to ask any questions. This chat is open until 5pm

User has removed their details User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:33

How do I know if I have a headache or a migraine. I have them sometimes at school

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:32

Do you suffer migraines? Do you know anyone who suffers migraines? What top tips would you give to help manage attacks?

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:33

60% of migraine sufferers don’t consult their doctor because they assume that nothing can be done to help them with their migraines. True that there is no cure for migraine, but there are options available to take control.

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:33

Acute treatments are those pain relief options you take at the start and during an attack. These could be an over the counter treatment or a prescription drug from your GP.
Pain relief like Ibuprofen, Aspirin or Paracetamol can sometimes be enough to relieve your migraine. You should take these as soon as possible as your digestive system shuts down during the attack phase (gastric stasis). Learning to recognise your early warning signs therefore can be key to managing or stopping an attack in its tracks. Keep a diary, to help you spot warning signs and possible triggers. Soluble tablets (dissolved in water) are a good option as they are absorbed quickly, or try taking tablets with a fizzy drink.

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:34

Hi StunnedRat, Great question. Migraine can be a much more intense throbbing headache, but there are a number of other symptoms that can appear at the same time, or without a headache at all.

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:35

Other symptoms can include; visual disturbances, paralysis, stomach pain, photo-sensitivity

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:36

What type of symptoms do you experience StunnedRat?

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:39

Mainly a throb in my head. It goes after sometime but just wondered what it could be

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:41

How long does the pain usually last? Usually the pain aspect of a migraine attack lasts between 4 -72 hours, but everyone is different. Does the pain stop you from completing day to day activities?

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:44

The pain aspect of a migraine, can be just one phase of an attack. Some sufferers will experience a prodrome (early warning signs), an aura phase a main attack and then a postdrome (the "hangover" phase)

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:48

Prescription drugs can help to take away or reduce pain and discomfort. These include triptans, anti-inflammatories and anti-sickness medication. Triptans help vessels around the brain narrow and come as tablets, nasal sprays or injections. Anti-inflammatories block a chemical believed to contribute to migraines. Anti-sickness meds help if you suffer nausea or vomiting.
There are 7 forms of Triptans that may be prescribed. This could be Sumatriptan which is the drug name, but will come under the brand name such as Imigran.

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:48

Many migraine patients manage their condition very effectively with acute treatments (i.e. triptans and painkillers). However, these should not be taken more often than on two or three days each week, or it can lead to medication overuse. Unfortunately cold turkey is the solution to medication overuse, which can be extremely difficult and something we definitely want to avoid.
To avoid taking too many pain killers, a preventative treatment may be the best option. This could include things such as Beta blockers (e.g. propanolol, atenolol, metoprolol, nadolol and timolol) which were originally developed for the treatment of high blood pressure. Additionally Anti-depressants can also be prescribed – this is not to manage depression so don’t be alarmed if this is prescribed. These will be prescribed in low doses that you take on a daily basis.
To help see whether a preventative treatment is effectively working, we would recommend that you keep a diary to measure the number of and intensity of your attacks. If you do not see a reduction after 3-4 months of around 30%, this treatment is probably not for you. Migraine Action can give lots of information on what treatments are available and what side affects you may experience, so contact us to discuss through in more detail.
There are several preventative treatments, all the way up to the likes of Botox, but the use of each will be dependent on your medical history, your age and other factors that could mean not all treatments are suitable.

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:49

Medication is not the only option for some migraine sufferers and we receive a lot of calls to our helpline (open weekdays 10am to 4pm on 08456 011 033) on non-medicinal options for treating migraine.
For some affected, acupuncture (which is available on the NHS as of 2015 for the treatment of migraine), can be really helpful in managing attacks, particularly for those who have found both topiramate and propranolol unsuitable and ineffective. Non-Invasive Devices like electrical device Cefaly, can also be helpful to limiting the number of attacks. These sometimes can work very well in tandem with your medications to limit the impact of attacks.
Additionally vitamins can be very helpful for migraine sufferers. For those affected by migraine with aura, magnesium in quite high dosage every day can be really helpful. Like all ongoing treatment options however, there are side effects to be aware of (e.g. magnesium is a natural laxative, so could lead to an upset tummy).
What works for one person won’t work for everyone, so it is really important you find the treatment options that you are happy with, and are controlling your attacks.

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 16:58

This chat is closing in 2 mins. Please feel free to ask any last few questions. We hope this has been really helpful :)

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 17:01

The chat is now closed. Thanks for chatting. If you have any other questions please drop us an email at info@migraine.org.uk, or call our helpline on 08456 011 033. Have a look on this website under the migraine section for more info :)

User has removed their details / 8 Aug 17:04

This chat is now closed, thanks for taking part.

Should you need anymore information on this topic, have a look at:

Health for Teens: Migraine Section

Alternatively you could speak to your parent/carer, a trusted adult, member of school staff, your school nurse or doctor. If there is an emergency then please contact 999 or visit A&E.

You can text your school nurse through the ChatHealth messaging service which runs Monday - Friday 9am - 4pm. If you go to school in Leicester City please text 07520 615386, if you go to school in Leicestershire County or Rutland then please text 07520 615387.

This chat is now closed!

This chat is now closed, thanks for taking part.

Should you need anymore information on this topic, have a look at:

Health for Teens: Migraine Section

Alternatively you could speak to your parent/carer, a trusted adult, member of school staff, your school nurse or doctor.  If there is an emergency then please contact 999 or visit A&E.

Find help in your local area

Find out what services are available to you in your area. Remember your school nurse is always there to give you confidential help and support.