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Contraception And Having Safe Sex: Just The Facts

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This page contains sensitive material which should not be viewed by anyone under the age of 16.

This page contains sensitive material which should not be viewed by anyone under the age of 16.

Contraception is used to stop unwanted pregnancy, and to make sure sexually transmitted infections (STI) (7 Facts About Sexually Transmitted Infections) are not passed on. When contraception is used correctly, it is very effective.

When to use contraception

  • Every time young men and young women have sex together they should always use contraception that prevents both pregnancy and STI’s, unless they have decided to have a baby
  • When young men have sex with other young men they should always practice safe sex by using a condom (for anal and oral sex) to protects against STI’s
  • When young women have sex with other young women they should use a condom when sharing sex toys and a dental dam during oral sex.

If you have had unprotected sex you may be at risk of STI’s or Pregnancy. If you have recently had unprotected sex, you may need emergency contraception. Seek advice straight away from your school nurse, GP or your local sexual health clinic.

It’s important to consider which form of contraception is right for you and your partner. If you have any questions or want to know more speak to your school nurse, visit your local sexual health clinic or visit your GP.

Emergency Contraception

  • If you’ve had unprotected sex and don’t want to get pregnant, you can take the Emergency Hormonal Contraceptive (EHC) pill. It’s commonly known as the ‘Morning after Pill’ however this is misleading as it can be used up to 72 hours or three days after unprotected sex
  • Talk to your School Nurse they’re there to support you  
  • The EHC is available from for free from Contraceptive Services, Urgent Care and selected Pharmacies. It’s always a good idea to phone ahead to see if it’s available
  • You can also have a coil inserted into the womb (uterus) which will prevent pregnancies. This can be done up to 5 days after unprotected sex and can be left in to prevent pregnancies
  • EHC is more effective the sooner you take it, so act fast
  • Only women can get emergency contraception
  • Emergency contraception shouldn’t be used as a regular contraceptive.

 

How to get help

If you have any more questions on this area or would like to speak to somebody about this topic, have a look at the links or search for your local services in the blue box below. Alternatively you can always contact your public health nurse.

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Find help in your local area

Find out what services are available to you in your area. Remember your school nurse is always there to give you confidential help and support.